Time-lapse Sunflowers

Here’s a time-lapse video of a lilac tree and some sunflowers growing in a corner of my backyard from May 3 to October 16 of this year. I took one photo just about every day. The video is 30 seconds long, but only about 10 seconds are time-lapsed. In that portion of the video, one month goes by in about 2 seconds. The time-lapse effect is more impressive, I suppose, if you focus on a specific flower or a tree beside the fence — but something specific. I stopped taking the photos on October 16, 2009, when a storm destroyed all the sunflowers.

I DECIDED TO REMOVE THE VIDEO BECAUSE IT CONTAINS SOME PHILIP GLASS MUSIC AND I DON’T WANT TO GET SUED BY SONY MUSIC OR WHATEVER MULTI-NATIONAL CORPORATION THAT HAPPENS TO OWN THE RIGHTS TO THE MUSIC.

Buried, Cremated or Promessioned?

When you’re dead, do you want to be buried, cremated or promessioned? From article I just read in The Walrus:

The dearly departed are first supercooled in liquid nitrogen to about minus 196°C, then shattered into very small pieces on a vibration table… Next a vacuum is used to evaporate moisture while a metal separator… shuffles aside fillings, crowns, titanium hips, and so on… Finally, the vaguely pink crumbs are deposited in a large box made of corn or potato starch.

Then the biodegradable box is buried and a tree or a bush or nothing is planted on top, and that’s it.

From the Wikipedia entry for ‘Promession’:

The volume of remains left by this procedure is about ten to twenty times that left by a cremation, but the advantages claimed include avoiding the release of pollutants into the atmosphere (for instance, mercury vapour from dental fillings) and the rapid degradation of the remains after the procedure (within 6 to 12 months).

STOP THE PRESSES! There’s a video too:

Watching a Lilac Tree

I just took a photo of the lilac tree in my backyard.

I drove a nail into the railing on my back deck. I braced the camera against the nail and lined up the left edge of the frame to the edge of the shed. I’ll add a new photo every day until the tree is in full bloom. Press the play button on the embedded slide show and watch the lovely lilac flowers come into bloom. If the results are interesting, I’ll eventually post a time-lapse video of the whole thing.

I’ve also planted sunflowers up against the shed and the fence on the right. The sunflowers can grow up to 4 metres (translation for American readers: that’s really high; think Day of the Triffids). I’m more interested in the sunflowers than the lilac tree.

UPDATE (Oct. 17/09): The slideshow has been removed and replaced with the lilac tree and sunflower photos. The final time-lapse video can be viewed at Time-lapse Sunflowers.