Christopher Moore Is In England

Christopher Moore, the author of the excellent Lamb, is in England and has made some interesting observations, including:

  • The waiter will never bring the check unless you ask for it. It would be like asking you to leave. They will bring you a cot and a wubby so you can sleep well, but they won’t bring the bill.
  • English food is not as bad as they say, especially Thai.
  • Scottish people can understand you, but you cannot understand them. The only thing you know how to say in their language is, “She kinna take warp nine for long, Cap’n.”

Jesus Was Once A Teenager Too

Lamb: Gospel According to BiffLamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ’s Childhood Pal by Christopher Moore is a witty, thought-provoking, irreverent, hilarious novel about Biff, the fella the Bible forgot to include. He writes about adventures he and his best buddy (who happens to be THE Jesus) had: learning the teachings of Lao Tzu while living in caves; becoming almost Buddhists while learning Kung Fu; and doing a lot of the stuff most of us are familiar with from Christianity. The book is bound to piss off some Christian.

Christopher Moore has a great website, where he suggests some of his favorite books, and has a blog-like page, which is actually a forum where he posts to randomly. In his latest post he answers some fan questions, including:

If you were going to be at a dinner party with other (living) authors, who would you hope the other guests would be?

He replies:

Hmmm. Living? Tom Robbins, Kurt Vonnegut, Nick Hornby, Terry Pratchett, Dave Barry, Stephen Frye, Hugh Laurie, Billy Collins, Calvin Trillan, and Bill Bryson. And only under the condition that I don’t have to say anything.

Made me laugh.

I’ve since read Moore’s:

  • Fluke: Or, I Know Why the Winged Whale Sings: an often silly, but original and educational story about whales and why they sing, sorta. The story was getting too incredible for me towards the end, but still enjoyable.
  • Coyote Blue: I enjoyed this more than Fluke, but less than Lamb. It’s about a guy who left his native indian heritage in the past due to an incident, when one day the indian spirits decide to haunt him in a good way.

A big thanks to Rebecca for recommending Lamb to me, introducing me to Moore.

By the way, the post’s title is from the Rheostatics song of the same name, from their album Introducing Happiness.