Tag Archives: chrome

If You Like Steel White Table, You’ll Like…

Google Simlar Pages is a Google Chrome extension that recommends webpages similar to the one you’re currently viewing.
google similar pages
Google Similar Pages recommends the following when viewing this site (Steel White Table):

What the hell is “The J-Walk Blog“?!

Software I Use A Lot in 2011

My original list of Software I Use A Lot was posted in Feb 2005 – 6 years ago. Here’s what I used then and what I use now:

Free Software:

Commericial Software:

  • 2005: Ultraedit (text/hex editor). 2011: Replaced with freeware mentioned above – Notepad++.
  • 2005: Microsoft Word (only at work). 2011: Same but version 14 (2010) now.
  • 2005: Microsoft Excel. 2011: Same but version 14 (2010) now.
  • 2005: Microsoft Money. 2011: Mint.
  • 2005: Winzip (ZIP utility). 2011: Replaced with freeware – 7-Zip.

I Almost Switched to Chrome Today

My default browser is Firefox and has been for years. I’m not a Luddite. I have enough technical skill to customize my browser so it’s just the way I like it, but I prefer to keep my browsing options simple. For instance, I don’t use RSS readers. If I can’t go to a site on my own, then I probably don’t need the information anyway. So that’s where I am as a web user. I’m probably more internet savvy than the average Internet Explorer user, but I don’t want to do anything that resembles coding or become inundated with too much information.

I installed Google’s Chrome browser a few times over the past year or so, but the Adblock function was clunky and the zoom feature for magnifying pages didn’t remember the amount of zoom for each page, requiring a manual zoom every time. (I don’t like micro fonts.) I decided I wouldn’t try Chrome again until those issued were addressed.

FAVOURITE SITESThose issues have been addressed with the latest version of Chrome. So I imported my bookmarks and my tool bar from Firefox (can’t live without my buttons) and things were looking great. The transition was easy and painless.

But it wasn’t long before I noticed the absence of two features, and it’s a deal breaker for me.

Firefox saves my most visited sites in the address bar and allows me to access them instantly. Chrome doesn’t. In Firefox, I don’t even have to bookmark my most popular sites. I just click a little triangle at the end of the address bar and ten or so of my most frequented sites are listed. Then I easily click on the site I want to go to. This is a huge time saver for me.

SEARCHESThe other missing feature in Chrome is the easy installation and use of multiple search engines. I have about twenty search engines that I can access in Firefox with two clicks. Is that the case with Chrome? I don’t know, because I gave up when I was required to modify some URL code while trying to add a search engine to Chrome. Adding a search plugin to Firefox requires practically no technical skill, and that’s the way it should be. Chrome needs to simpify the installation and use of multiple search engines.

My latest trial of Chrome lasted for maybe fifteen minutes. It’s possible I didn’t give it enough time. If I’d poked around a little more, I may have discovered quick and easy methods for accessing my most visited sites and using multiple search engines. Any Chrome users who would like to enlighten me, please do so in the comments. I like the look and the speed of Chrome (it’s fast) and I’m willing to make the switch from Firefox. Just not yet. Google came this close. So close.

UPDATE (Feb. 23/11): Firefox has been extra slow lately, so I’m giving Chrome another try. The plugins Pender posted are useful. The recent history plugin (so far) does an okay job at mimicking Firefox, which speeds things up. The multiple search engine plugin is an improvement over Chrome’s default multiple search feature, but neither one of them outshines the under-rated Mycroft Project which makes setting up and selecting multiple search engines in Firefox a breeze.

In Firefox, I can look for a new search engine through Mycroft, then install it and use it in about 30 seconds. In Chrome, again, I would have to go to the website I want to search, do a search, copy the resulting URL into Chrome’s search engine manager, and then change the URL by replacing the search object inside the URL with this code: %s. All of that is asking too much for a general user (especially any kind of coding), and it would likely take me my lunch hour to do that with all the search engines I use on a regular basis. (Setting up the multiple search engine plugin requires the same amount of messing around, though it’s easier to use once it’s finally set up.)

And then actually using the multiple search engine feature in Chrome — I don’t see what all the fuss is about. It’s clever how the Omnibox anticipates the search and can recognize the specific search engine by a nickname, but is that any faster or easier than choosing a search engine from a drop-down box in Firefox and typing in the search? It also requires the user to remember all the installed search engines and their nicknames.

Chrome’s multiple search engine features are not an improvement over similar features available in Firefox, but I’m impressed with the enhancements Google has made to the browser so far. They’re getting there.

I’ll continue to test the browser, but further updates will show up in the comments.

Switching from Firefox to Chrome

In 2004 I switched from Internet Explorer to FireFox.

ie firefox chrome

I’m now switching from Firefox to Chrome. I’ve played with Chrome occasionally since it was released, but now it supports Extensions, similar to Firefox’s addons, enabling me to block ads and other annoying website “features” (usually flash-specific).

Google’s Chrome browser has these advantages over Firefox:

  • It’s noticably faster for me – starting up and browing websites.
  • Its interface has less clutter, although that can be annoying too: I sometimes have to hunt for functions I don’t use often.
  • It crashes less often.
  • Incognito mode is useful when working on client or public sites.

Some things I don’t like about Chrome, which Firefox has an advantage over:

  • New windows pop up for some sites. Firefox has addons that take of that crap – Chrome needs a bit more work in that department.
  • It’s not as customizable as Firefox.
  • More addons are available for Firefox, although Chrome now supports ad-blocking, so this is not a big issue.

If you do decide to switch from Firefox or Internet Explorer (anyone still use IE?) to Chrome, it seamlessly imports all your bookmarks and saved form and password data, if you used those functions.

Have you made the switch?