Book Review: Wake by Robert Sawyer

Wake by Robert J. Sawyer  (4/10) I’ll read most anything Sawyer writes because his ideas are fascinating and original, but I’m beginning to lose my enthusiasm after reading this. Sawyer has brilliant, intriguing ideas, and he conveys them well – it’s the main reason I’ll read most anything he publishes. Unfortunately, each new book appears to be pandering to the masses: simple reading level, shallow characters with some gimmick to

Books I Read Recently

Looking for Calvin and Hobbes: The Unconventional Story of Bill Watterson and His Revolutionary Comic Strip by Nevin Martell  (7/10) This is a well-written biography of Bill Watterson, the author of the best comic strip ever, Calvin and Hobbes. The author writes about Watterson’s reclusiveness a lot, describing how few interviews are given. Martell interviews lots of friends and people who know Watterson, and provides an interesting portrait, although you

Books I Read Recently

No Country For Old Men by Cormac McCarthy  (8/10) Engrossing, well-written novel about a sheriff tracking down a killer who’s after someone that stumbled on some drug money in the middle of a desert. I wouldn’t want to see the well-reviewed movie if it portrays the violence in the book. Rollback by Robert J. Sawyer  (7/10) A science-fiction novel that won the Hugo and Nebula Awards. As I’ve written before,

Books I’ve Read Recently

Next by Michael Crichton  (3/10) Too many characters with too little detail. Crichton seems to be getting worse, writing about topics that are interesting but a story with no substance. He creates short, interesting scenarios and dilemmas to raise issues related to the topic of his book (genetics in this case), but the story and characters are just fluff and a waste of time. The best part is the Author’s

Books I’ve Read Recently

The Road by Cormac McCarthy  (9/10) Yes, this is an Oprah pick, but I read that it had a science-fiction element to it, and it was cheap (at Costco). It’s a depressing novel about a father and son wandering America after civilization has been destroyed. It’s violent, touching, and memorable. The author doesn’t follow the rules of grammar for the most part, helping to set the somber tone and chaos