Observations From a Canadian Working In Detroit

  • Radio advertisements tend to have disclaimers at the end of them, where the announcer spews a book size run of words so fast it’s impossible to understand the content, like the small “print” in car advertisements in newspapers and magazines. It’s ridiculous.
  • Stairs in office buildings have parabolic mirrors on the bottom floor, so people walking down can see if any wackos are hiding beneath the bottom stairwell.
  • Women’s bathrooms in office buildings require a key.
  • TV advertisements for drugs are common.
  • Beer and books are cheap, food is expensive.
  • Cars don’t stop for pedestrians unless they have to.
  • More Pringles variety here: Smoky Bacon, and White Cheddar.
  • Traffic signs indicating how much you’ll be fined if you kill a road worker. Is it a dare?
  • Plastic surgery ads are prevalent, most starting with something like: “Are you happy with the size of your breasts?”
  • Drivers have little patience for Canadian drivers going the speed limit; and drivers seem to use their horn more than their blinker. I think I’ve used my car horn less than 5 times IN 20 YEARS.
  • It gets so humid here, my glasses fog up after getting out of my air-conditioned car.
  • Movie theaters are insanely loud, though their reclining seats and amphitheatre-style are cool.
  • Gasoline prices fluctuate wildly from one block to the next, and unleaded gasoline is more expensive than diesel.
  • Road signs advertising that car-pooling is available by calling an 800 number.
  • There are NO classical music radio stations. Fortunately, I can pick up CBC’s Radio-2.
  • Single-malt scotch is more expensive, although they have a better variety (depending on where you shop).
  • A Canadian “large” size beverage is an “extra large” here, and no one sells a “small”.
  • Food portions at restaurants are insanely huge and wasteful.