Software I Use A Lot in 2011

My original list of Software I Use A Lot was posted in Feb 2005 – 6 years ago. Here’s what I used then and what I use now: Free Software: 2005: Firefox (browser). 2011: Google Chrome. 2005: Filezilla (ftp client). 2011: Filezilla. 2005: Irfanview (graphic viewer). 2011: Irfanview. 2005: Keynote (enhanced notepad). 2011: Notepad++ 2005: Process Explorer (system utility). 2011: Process Explorer. 2005: xplorer lite (Windows Explorer replacement). 2011: Nothing

I Almost Switched to Chrome Today

My default browser is Firefox and has been for years. I’m not a Luddite. I have enough technical skill to customize my browser so it’s just the way I like it, but I prefer to keep my browsing options simple. For instance, I don’t use RSS readers. If I can’t go to a site on my own, then I probably don’t need the information anyway. So that’s where I am

Switching from Firefox to Chrome

In 2004 I switched from Internet Explorer to FireFox. I’m now switching from Firefox to Chrome. I’ve played with Chrome occasionally since it was released, but now it supports Extensions, similar to Firefox’s addons, enabling me to block ads and other annoying website “features” (usually flash-specific). Google’s Chrome browser has these advantages over Firefox: It’s noticably faster for me – starting up and browing websites. Its interface has less clutter,

Firefox Addon Development

I have an idea for a Firefox addon that I’m considering developing, despite having a few other projects on the go (eg. specialized ftp client for Steve, website for a client…). In any case, I’m creating this post as a repository of Firefox addon development bookmarks. You’ll be the first to know if I ever get around to developing it. Google results for firefox addon development. Building an Extension tutorial.

Running Executables From Firefox

Firefox doesn’t support opening Windows executable files (i.e. files with an .exe extension); you have to save it, then manually run it. I missed the ability to execute a program directly from a browser (as Internet Explorer allows). The OpenDownload add-on fixes that. When you click an executable, the dialog now has a “Run” button, which will cause Firefox to download the program to your system’s TEMP directory, then executes